Social Justice Film Series

Social Justice Film Series Graphic

 

Mauro Family Fund LogoWe believe in the power of cinema to breed empathy and understanding!  We believe in a transformative cinema that can create a more equal and just world.

Through the support of The Mauro Family Foundation, we bring you groundbreaking documentaries and films that will stir you from your seat, and into action!!

 


Still image from Capernaum Capernaum
dir. Nadine Labaki
2018 | Lebanon / France / United States | 126 min

After running away from his negligent parents, committing a violent crime and being sentenced to five years in jail, a hardened, streetwise 12-year-old Lebanese boy sues his parents in protest of the life they have given him.

 

 

 

Still Image from For SameFor Sama
dir. Waad Al-Kateab & Edward Watts 
2019 | United States / United Kingdom / Syria | 100 min.

For Sama is both an intimate and epic journey into the female experience of war. A love letter from a young mother to her daughter, the film tells the story of Waad al-Kateab’s life through five years of the uprising in Aleppo, Syria. Her camera captures incredible stories of loss, laughter and survival as Waad wrestles with an impossible choice– flee to protect her daughter’s life or stay and continue the struggle for freedom.

 

 

Still image from Killing Patient Zero

Killing Patient Zero
dir. Laurie Lynd
2019 | Canada | 100 min.

The Stonewall riots and the gay liberation movement ushered in a new era of freedom but it also signalled the beginning of an impending epidemic of AIDS. Gaetan Dugas was a gay French-Canadian flight attendant who offered to help early scientific research into the origins of AIDS. An unfortunate series of events followed and he would be vilified as Patient Zero, the man who gave us AIDS.

 

 

Still image for MaximaMaxima
dir. Claudia Sparrow
2019 | United States | 88 min.

An Indigenous woman from the Peruvian Andes who cannot read or write, stands up to one of the largest gold producers in the world, US-based Newmont Mining Corporation, who has claimed ownership of her land in order to expand its multi-billion dollar gold mine. In this David vs Goliath story we witness Máxima’s courage as she fights back to protect the one thing worth more than gold: the land and its ability to sustain her and her community.

 

 

Still image from We Will Stand Upnîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up
dir. Tasha Hubbard
2019 | Canada | 98 min.

When Colten Boushie died from a gunshot to the back of his head after entering Gerald Stanley’s rural property with his friends, the Cree man’s death captured international attention. Sensitively directed by Tasha Hubbard, nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up weaves a profound narrative encompassing the filmmaker’s own adoption, the stark history of colonialism on the Prairies, and a vision of a future where Indigenous children can live safely on their homelands.

 

 

 

Still image from One Child NationOne Child Nation
dir. Lynn Zhang & Nanfu Wang
2019 | China/United States | 85 min.

China’s one child policy has led to unthinkable human rights violations. Director Nanfu Wang digs fearlessly into her own personal life, weaving her experience as a new mother and the firsthand accounts of her family members with testimony from both victims and perpetrators. She fearlessly uncovers how government propaganda brainwashed and terrorized people into committing criminal acts against their own friends and family. The film is a revelatory and essential record of China’s chilling social experiment.

 

 

 

Urban Eclipse: Rising Tides of Kekekoziibii (Shoal Lake 40) still image from the filmUrban Eclipse: Rising Tides of Kekekoziibii (Shoal Lake 40)
dir. Jesse Green & Vanda Fleury-Green
2019 | Manitoba | 77 mins 

The Shoal Lake aqueduct is a major artery piping drinking water to homes in Winnipeg. But its history speaks to a dirty truth for Kekekoziibii, the Shoal Lake 40 First Nation who was displaced, isolated and robbed of its own drinking water. Filmmaker Jesse Green travels back to his home community interviewing people about the impacts of the aqueduct in the 100 years since it was built.